jQuery workshop teaching techniques, part 3: ruthless backward design

I’m writing up what I learned from teaching a jQuery workshop this past month. I’ve already posted on my theoretical basis, pacing, and supporting affective goals. Now for the technique I invested the most time in and got the most mileage out of…

Ruthless backward design

Yes, yes, we all know we are supposed to do backward design, and I always have a general sense of it in my head when I design courses. In practice it’s hard, because you can’t always carve out the time to write an entire course in advance of teaching it, but for a two-day bootcamp I’m doing that anyway

Yeah. Super ruthless. I wrote the last lesson, on functions, first. Along the way I took notes of every concept and every function that I relied on in constructing my examples. Then I wrote the second-to-last lesson, using what I could from that list (while keeping the pacing consistent), and taking notes on anything else I needed to have already introduced – again, right down to the granularity of individual jQuery functions. Et cetera. My goal was that, by the time they got to writing their own functions (with the significant leap in conceptual difficulty that entails), they would have already seen every line of code that they’d need to do the core exercises, so they could work on the syntax and concepts specific to functions in isolation from all the other syntax and concepts of the course. (Similarly, I wanted them to be able to write loops in isolation from the material in lessons 1 and 2, and if/then statements in isolation from the material in lesson 1.)

This made it a lot easier for me to see both where the big conceptual leaps were and what I didn’t need. I ended up axing .css() in favor of .addClass(), .removeClass(), and .hasClass() – more functions, but all conceptually simpler ones, and more in line with how I’ve written real-world code anyway. It meant that I axed booleans – which in writing out notes on course coverage I’d assumed I’d cover (such a basic data type, and so approachable for librarians!) – when I discovered I did not need their conceptual apparatus to make the subsequent code make sense. It made it clear that .indexOf() is a pain, and students would need to be familiar with its weirdness so it didn’t present any hurdles when they had to incorporate it into bigger programs.

Funny thing: being this ruthless and this granular meant I actually did get to the point where I could have done real-world-ish exercises with one more session. I ended up providing a few as further practice options for students who chose jQuery practice rather than the other unconference options for Tuesday afternoon. By eliminating absolutely everything unnecessary, right down to individual lines of code, I covered enough ground to get there. Huh!

So yeah. If I had a two-day workshop, I’d set out with that goal. A substantial fraction of the students would feel very shaky by then – it’s still a ton of material to assimilate, and about a third of my survey respondents’ brains were full by the time we got to functions – but including a real-world application would be a huge motivational payoff regardless. And group work plus an army of TAs would let most students get some mileage out of it. Add an option for people to review earlier material in the last half-day, and everyone’s making meaningful progress. Woot!

Also, big thanks to Sumana Harihareswara for giving me detailed feedback on a draft of the lesson, and helping me see the things I didn’t have the perspective to see about sequencing, clarity, etc. You should all be lucky enough to have a proofreader so enthusiastic and detail-oriented.

Later, where I want to go next.

Advertisements

jQuery workshop teaching techniques, part 2: techniques geared at affective goals

I’m writing up what I learned from teaching a jQuery workshop this past month. I’ve already posted on my theoretical basis and pacing. Today, stuff I did to create a positive classroom climate and encourage people to leave the workshop motivated to learn more. (This is actually an area of relative weakness for me, teaching-wise, so I really welcome anyone’s suggestions on how to cultivate related skills!)

Post-it notes

I distributed a bunch of them and had students put them on their laptops when they needed help. This lets them summon TAs without breaking their own work process. I also had them write something that was working and something that wasn’t on post-its at the end of Day 1, so I could make a few course corrections for Day 2 (and make it clear to the students that I care about their feedback and their experience). I shamelessly stole both tactics from Software Carpentry.

Inclusion and emotion

The event was conducted under the DLF Code of Conduct, which I linked to at the start of the course material. I also provided Ada Initiative material as background. I talked specifically, at the outset, about how learning to code can be emotionally tough; it pushes the limits of our frustration tolerance and often (i.e. if we’re not young, white men) our identity – “am I the kind of person who programs? do people who program look like me?” And I said how all that stuff is okay. Were I to do it over again, I’d make sure to specifically name impostor syndrome and stereotype threat, but I’ve gotten mostly good feedback about the emotional and social climate of the course (whose students represented various types of diversity more than I often see in a programming course, if less than I’d like to see), and it felt like most people were generally involved.

Oh, and I subtly referenced various types of diversity in the book titles I used in programming examples, basically as a dog-whistle that I’ve heard of this stuff and it matters to me. (Julia Serano’s Whipping Girl, which I was reading at the time and which interrogated lots of stuff in my head in awesome ways, showed up in a bunch of examples, and a student struck up a conversation with me during a break about how awesome it is. Yay!)

As someone who’s privileged along just about every axis you can be, I’m clueless about a lot of this stuff, but I’m constantly trying to suck less at it, and it was important to me to make that both implicit and explicit in the course.

Tomorrow, how ruthless and granular backward design is super great.

jQuery workshop teaching techniques, part 1: pacing

I’m writing up what I learned from teaching a jQuery workshop this past month. I’ve already posted on my theoretical basis. Now for the teaching techniques I used, drawing on my past teaching experience, to get mileage out of that inspiration. Today: pacing!

Pacing (macro-scale)

I covered the same material, conceptually, that I’ve taught before as a one-day Python workshop (itself borrowed from the day-and-a-bit Boston Python Workshop, but I broke it into 90-ish minute segments, with breaks in between (some of them long), over a day and a half. I think the down time is critical; people’s brains get full and they can’t absorb new material. Crucially, this also let me put functions on day two. They’re the hardest new concept, and they build on everything that’s gone before, and my intuition told me that giving people a chance to sleep on things would help. Informal student feedback suggests I was right.

Pacing (micro-scale)

Boston Python Workshop does a long self-paced intro that covers all the concepts, then a long interactive lecture that reiterates and formalizes them, then a long practice session. This is great for accommodating students at a variety of levels (and people do come to these with tremendously varying background), but wrong otherwise. The two-hour lecture is too much infodump, and students don’t really know if they’ve understood it until they get to the practice phase.

Worse, in my experience most people are poor judges of whether they understand new material; “I’ve seen this before” feels enough like “I understand it” that people don’t realize how serious the gaps in their mental models may be until they actually have to do independent work. If the practice session isn’t until after all the material has been introduced, most students will have spent most of the lecture building later concepts on top of flawed understandings of earlier concepts, so by the time they get a chance to correct things they’ll have an awful lot to correct (and the difficulty in doing so is more-than-linear with the accumulation of new material).

I wanted to expose problems with mental models quickly so students could self-correct before having gone too far astray, so I did much shorter mini-lectures interspersed with hands-on practice. (This dovetails, of course, with the paper on test harnesses from yesterday.) The army of TAs was great here, meaning that people who needed help usually got it immediately (and many students pointed this out specifically as a helpful feature of the course – thank you again to all the TAs!).

What I learned teaching jQuery (part 1)

On August 11-12, I taught an Introduction to Programming Concepts via jQuery course at the DLF/Code4Lib unconference at the George Washington University. I was playing with several theories in developing this course:

  • Porting to jQuery so that it could be 100% browser-based: familiar environment, no installfest, maximizes time available for actual programming concepts.
  • Porting to jQuery so that it could be 100% visual (on which more below).
  • Simply giving up on the idea of getting true novices to the point of being able to write real-world-applicable code in a day-and-a-half workshop, and focusing instead on building a foundation that makes existing code-learning resources more intelligible, and leaves students with enough good feelings about code that they’ll be inclined to learn more.

Bottom line: I think it worked really well!

Today I’m going to talk about my theoretical inspiration for the course; upcoming posts will cover teaching techniques I used to operationalize that, and then future plans. (Look, there’s a jquery workshop tag so you can find them all!)

yo dawg i heard you like tests…

The whole workshop was, in a sense, a way to play with this paper: “A fresh look at novice programmers’ performance and their teachers’ expectations”. Its jaw-dropping result was that providing novice programming students with a test apparatus for a programming task quadrupled the number of subtasks they could successfully complete (students without the tests completed an average of 0.83 out of 4 tasks, compared to 3.26 for students who could check their work against the tests — in other words, students without tests didn’t even get one subtask working, on average).

Well gosh. If tests are that effective, I’m obligated to provide them. This is consistent with my intuitive observations of the CodingBat section of Boston Python Workshop — being asked to write provably correct code is the point where students discover whether their existing mental models are right, and start to iterate them. But the CodingBat interface is confusing, and you need to sink some instructional time just into making sense of it. And, honestly, with a lot of conventional intro programming tasks, it’s hard to tell if you’ve succeeded; you’ve got a command-line-ish interface (unfamiliar to many of my students) and a conceptual problem with abstract success criteria. I wanted something that would give immediate, obvious feedback.

Hence, jQuery. Manipulating the DOM produces instant visual effects. If you were asked to make a button disappear, it’s super obvious if you succeeded. (Well. Possibly assuming sightedness, and (with some of my tasks) possibly also non-colorblindness — I stayed away from red/green semantic pairs, but I didn’t audit for all the forms of colorblindness. I need to mull this one over.) And as it turns out, when you ask your students to add a class that changes a bunch of things to have a kitten pic background, it’s also super obvious to you as the instructor when they’ve succeeded (wait for it…wait…“awwww!”).

My hope for this class was that it would provide students who were genuinely novices at coding with the conceptual background they needed to get mileage out of the many intro-programming learning options out there. As Abigail Goben notes, these courses tend to implicitly assume that you already know how to code and just need to be told how to do it in this language, even when they brand themselves as intro courses. People will need much more practice than a day-and-a-half bootcamp to get from novice to proficient enough to write things they can use in everyday work, so I want to get them to a place where that practice will feel manageable. And for the students who do have some experience, hopefully I can introduce them to a language they don’t know yet in a way that has enough meat not to bore them.

Tomorrow, teaching techniques I used to get there, part 1: pacing.